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    1. #1
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      Default Drishyam 2: Jeethu Joseph's masterpiece

      When Drishyam 2 was announced, I greeted it with a mixture of suspicion and excitement. Suspicion, given Jeethu's recent track record, Ashirwad's desperate need for financing their future ambitious projects and the rule of the sequel never being as good as its predecessor. Excitement, because one could definitely build a thread based on the fallout from the crime, the reaction of the families, and the police's determination to set things right.

      Added to this came COVID-19 and the subsequent lockdown restrictions. More and more it seemed, especially with the move towards OTT, that this seemed a quickie to rejuvenate a sagging industry and provide much needed employment to the artists and technicians.

      Not in my biggest dreams would it be that Drishyam 2 would not only sweep away all misconceptions, but also rival (if not better) the first part!

      Jeethu Joseph's vision has now ensured that the sequel has stretched everyone's imagination regarding the future of Georgekutty, the respective families and the police's next moves. It has expanded all possibilities and showed how creative one can get from what seemed like a watertight original film that did not require any further development.

      The best film can be seen in multiple perspectives or layers. Drishyam 2 brings in 3 perspectives. Firstly, we can see it from the POV of the police. Their determination and tenacity to uncover how the crime was committed and where the body was found. Secondly, we can look at how Georgekutty tackles the new set of challenges that emerge, and re-visit the character's actions entirely after the events unfold. Thirdly and most hauntingly, this movie is a tragedy, looking at two families at different sets of the spectrum (Prabhakar and Georgekutty families) and the fallout from the events of the first film. What is most remarkable is Jeethu Joseph has put together the film in such a way that one can see both films as one film with the body's revelation at the police station at the end of the first film, as an interval point. Georgekutty's character arc seems all the more remarkable and ingenious as a result when we rewind our minds all the way back to the interval of Drishyam 1.

      Unlike the first film, Jeethu brings our attention from the word go with a well taken opening sequence. Instead of splitting neatly between a slow-burn family drama followed by a thriller like Part One, the director has filled the narrative with clues, throwaway dialogues and visuals which are easily ignored on first viewing. He neatly alternates between the deceptive family bonding sequences and tense conversations at night along with some horror elements, which never lets the viewer relax. From the interval punch onwards, the movie races to its ingenious climax without breaking a sweat.

      Drishyam 2 also benefits from a fantastic set of performances from the principal cast who bring their A-game. Ansiba is particularly good, Meena has hauntingly portrayed her character, Siddique who is perhaps the only righteous character in a dark, grey film, gets the emotions just right especially in a wonderful scene early on with Mohanlal. Murali Gopy brings a sense of screen presence and gravitas to the police officer. Asha Sarath's performance seems better on a revisit. Anjali Nair aces the multiple facets of her role. And Mohanlal pulls of potentially the most challenging role of his commercial career during the 21st century, second guessing us, making us laugh, cry, all whilst ensuring his character remains mysterious, secretive and badass at the same time. All credit has to go to the writer/director for creating a character, which will be among the most memorable in the veteran's illustrious career.

      Technically, the movie benefits from a melodious song, BGM is a mixed bag while Satheesh Kurup's cinematography is a highlight in the climatic sequences.

      This is a dark, grey and tragic film which benefits tremendously from its ingenious creativity and superb direction. While we wonder at how things happened in reel life, Jeethu Joseph, who roars back to form after a few average films, should be seen as the real Georgekutty.

      Rating: 4.25/5

    2. #2
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      An outstanding review

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